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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Brighten the Corner Where You Are.

Posted Tuesday, July 19, 2011, at 7:04 PM

(Photo)
May we bring as much beauty to someone's life as God has given us in Nature to enjoy.
There is an old hymn that has been sung in many small churches across the country called; "Brighten The Corner Where You Are." As I think about it, I can hear Tennessee Ernie Ford singing the chorus with great enthusiasm in my head.

Most of us do not have much in the way of extra resources or we are physically limited to our homes and a general local area.

But if you are reading this blog, you have access to a computer! There are people who volunteer for a multitude of things because of what they see on the internet or watch on TV.

On Sunday, I watched a documentary about how many volunteers were taking the time to help our wounded vets. They were providing necessary resources to aid them in their physical recovery. There was even a person who trained service dogs to aid veterans to begin their lives anew with every day routines.

One of the speakers was a young woman who said something very wise. She told the veterans that you have to leave the past behind and re-train your mind to do things differently. She told them that it is only hopeless when a person keeps wanting to use their limbs like they had two legs instead of one. What I liked best was her T-Shirt that said, "Don't Feel Sorry For Me, I Will Be Passing You Soon"

She has lost her leg at the age of 6 months. She now has three different styles of artificial legs to fit her active lifestyle. One adjusted the heel so that she could wear high-heels for dressing up. One leg was for running and another was for swimming.

One of the biggest issues facing our wounded warriors today is PTSD. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. There are organizations finally recognizing a desperate need for our soldiers to decompress before returning home to their families and jobs.

Going through a divorce or some other lifestyle change can have a dramatic impact upon your life also. Along the way of discovering myself, I made many great friends. And one of them was Mabel Ator.

Mabel was 85 years old. She was a retired school-teacher who was widowed. After giving her a ride from the grocery store one day, she invited us into her home and gave us cookies and milk.

Mabel couldn't hear very well at all, but she loved children and would babysit for you. She saved the money that you paid her for her great-grandchildren's college tuition.

Mabel brightened my corner for nearly two years until I moved to Missouri.

My friend Susan had a Pembroke Corgi named Ian. He was the ambassador to Farview Veterinary Clinic. He was able to bring a calm to a very intense atmosphere. Ian was gifted with a personality that brought healing and comfort to frightened animals.

Our biggest fear should not be the calamities of nature or financial ruin. Instead, we should be mindful of the effect that our words have on each other. Sometimes, we are so eager to get into the fray, that we forget our manners and say things that have no bearing on the topic of conversation.

The great divide in our nation has nothing to do with politics or money. It has everything to do with selfishness and greed. Men and Women of Integrity, Honor and Loyalty are considered objects of ridicule and scorn.

So the first step to brightening someone's corner is to take inventory of your own. We are all very capable of finding good deeds to do. But all of this will be in vain, if you go home to yell at your spouse or kick the dog.

Our lives are changing at such a rapid pace, that we sometimes do not have a chance to recover before the next calamity comes knocking at our door.

Ina Duley Ogdon wrote the hymn "Brighten the Corner Where You Are" faced many disappointments. She planned to be in the ministry but was called home to care for her sick father. Instead, she began to write wonderful uplifting songs that have graced churches and homes for over 100 years.

She is just one example as to how our words can heal and uplift someone instead of tearing them down.

We might not find our talents until late in life, but it is never too late to start with a kind word or gesture. Our fingers can type respectful phrases just as easily as they type the nasty ones.

Just for kicks, I am going write out the words to the hymn:

Do not wait until some deed of greatness you may do,

Do not wait to shed your light afar,

To the many duties ever near you now be true,

Brighten the Corner Where You are.

Refrain

Brighten the Corner Where You are!

Brighten The Corner Where You Are!

Someone far from harbor you may guide across the bar;

Brighten the Corner Where you Are!

Just above are clouded skies that you may help to clear,

Let not narrow self your way debar;

Though in one heart along may fall your song of cheer,

Brighten the Corner Where You Are.

Refrain

Here for all your talent you may surely find a need,

Here reflect the bright and Morning Star;

Even from your humble hand the Bread of Life may feed;

Brighten the Corner Where You Are!

On Thursday, we will celebrate our dear friend Susan's life. There will be tears and sadness because we miss her so. The joy of her friendship has been a priceless gift to us all.

Dedicated to:

Susan Mauck

May 18th 1955 to July 15th 2011.

Susan-Mauck.blogspot.com


Comments
Showing comments in chronological order
[Show most recent comments first]

It is up at Pine. Thank you.

-- Posted by KH Gal on Wed, Jul 20, 2011, at 7:22 AM

Beautiful picture and a splendid post as well. You are right about talents. I rediscovered one that had been buried for many years. I don't know if you read the Statesman on line, but you will find me the every so often. The nice thing about the Statesman is that you can look at a persons profile and see all their posts. You are a fine level headed woman and I always enjoy anything you write. Take care and have a good life. See you around.

-- Posted by royincaldwell on Wed, Jul 20, 2011, at 6:29 PM

Thank you everyone. This was the boost I needed for today. It was tough to say goodbye to Susan.

-- Posted by KH Gal on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 8:55 PM

I read the Idaho Statesman, the TF Paper as well as this one every day.

-- Posted by KH Gal on Thu, Jul 21, 2011, at 8:56 PM


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Walking the Fence Line
Bonnie Bird
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Fixing fence is the one of the hardest jobs on a ranch. I no longer live on a ranch, but I do know what hard work is. Fences are everyone's concern, but nowadays,the "hole" is always your neighbor's side not your own. It used to be that you would respect your neighbor and mend the fence together. If their cows got in your field, a simple phone call resolved the problem. You might even saddle up your own horse and help them gather them up. We need more people who are willing to roll their sleeves up and fix the fence regardless of who your neighbor is. There are people in this country who need to be reminded that a fence is like the way you should conduct your life. Your posts should be straight and neat. The wire needs to be stretched tight and your gate might be closed, but can still be easily opened. And most of all, we can all saddle up together and ride the range, it won't matter if you have an Appaloosa, Quarter Horse or Thoroughbred. The cows still have to be gathered, fences have to be fixed, and the range is a wide open space of opportunity for us all.
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