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Sunday, December 21, 2014

Horse Sense-Trail Blazing

Posted Thursday, March 10, 2011, at 8:16 PM

Growing up, our family had some awesome experiences with camping. We almost always took our horses and headed up to Lime Creek. Most of our 4H camp trips were in that area too.

Dad's trail rides were not for the faint-of heart. We did not amble along some wide trail that had just been cleared. No! We had to break a new trail and that meant traversing steep mountains or jumping over trees. But the arduous journey was always worth it, because we discovered old mines, natural hot springs hidden from ordinary view and breathtaking scenery from the mountain tops.

We had a mare whose name was Pat. She belonged to my mom, who didn't ride very often. Pat was great to use for a trail ride. She was sure-footed and it didn't faze her to climb up a mountain side or travel down one either.

Horses are as unique as humans when it comes to making choices. Some horses will not cross a ditch without some agitated pacing, while others will jump over the biggest ditch and balk at the smallest one.

One horse will shy at a sudden noise and another will keep walking as though nothing happened

An ornery horse will bite you when your back is turned and a gentle horse will simply touch you with their nose.

The trail ride of yesterday is just a memory. Our horses could carry us up the mountains and through the valleys without losing their footing. And even when it became dark and stormy, we could trust them to take us home.

Today, our lives are filled with challenges and hidden dangers. It is said that our country is making history and blazing new trails. But in truth, we find that they are only paving over the old ones.

Making history or blazing new trails is not always a good thing. The history books are filled with hapless guides and infamous people who only claim to fame was a tragic event or a scandal.

Fortunately, we have also been blessed with men who had great faith and vision for this country. They crafted a timeless and inspired document to guide us back to the high road if we choose to do so.


Comments
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I love this one. I can't tell how many times in the dark, or even daylight, I just had to trust my horse to know where to go.

There are not that many people I would blindly follow, but I'd give over to a horse easy enough. They only wanna go home.

It brings to mind a thought of

"Anything worth doing is worth fighting for"

Like blazing a trail when another way might be easier, but it wouldn't have the same reward at the end.

thanks again

Jessie

-- Posted by jessiemiller on Fri, Mar 11, 2011, at 9:02 AM

Thank you Jessie

This one took me a little longer.

-- Posted by KH Gal on Fri, Mar 11, 2011, at 12:40 PM


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Walking the Fence Line
Bonnie Bird
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Fixing fence is the one of the hardest jobs on a ranch. I no longer live on a ranch, but I do know what hard work is. Fences are everyone's concern, but nowadays,the "hole" is always your neighbor's side not your own. It used to be that you would respect your neighbor and mend the fence together. If their cows got in your field, a simple phone call resolved the problem. You might even saddle up your own horse and help them gather them up. We need more people who are willing to roll their sleeves up and fix the fence regardless of who your neighbor is. There are people in this country who need to be reminded that a fence is like the way you should conduct your life. Your posts should be straight and neat. The wire needs to be stretched tight and your gate might be closed, but can still be easily opened. And most of all, we can all saddle up together and ride the range, it won't matter if you have an Appaloosa, Quarter Horse or Thoroughbred. The cows still have to be gathered, fences have to be fixed, and the range is a wide open space of opportunity for us all.
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